My New Biblical Studies Blog

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talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:31 pm

שלום,חברים!, Hello, friends/members!

After being away from blogging for several years, I've started a new Biblical studies blog, Let Ancient Voices Speak. It will feature study articles on various Bible topics from a Christian perspective, sermons, poetry, ancient language aids, and my own Bible version. You can find it at http://letancientvoicesspeak.wordpress.com.

I am currently researching an article on the Hebrew background of the name Jesus, particularly as it relates to Matthew 1:21, and the uses of the root ישע, "save"/"salvation" in the Tanakh. I hope to have it ready in a few weeks, and it will be the first Hebrew post under the Ancient Language Aids category.

Meanwhile, for those who work with Greek and Latin, there are two posts already published. Here are the titles and links:

“A Question of Greek Adjective Agreement: Romans 1:29 and Context”. https://wp.me/p9aTup-3s

"Noel, Noël, Natalis"! https://wp.me/p9aTup-4n (This was originally intended for Christmas 2017 but had to be postponed due to illness.)

I hope you will visit and give me feedback.

Dewayne Dulaney
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Thu Apr 26, 2018 6:55 pm

Α follow-up note: the regular Biblical studies articles will also reference Hebrew vocabulary and grammar when relevant, as will the notes in my Bible version.

Dewayne Dulaney
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

kwrandolph
Posts: 868
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2013 12:51 am

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby kwrandolph » Tue May 01, 2018 9:17 pm

Dear Dewayne:

Interesting blog. I’ll have to admit that my main interest is in your thoughts on Biblical Hebrew.

One resource I’d recommend for your resource page is http://www.crosswire.org . It has many Bible texts in multiple languages, including Koiné Greek and Biblical Hebrew. It also has software that runs on multiple platforms, so that I have the same WLC text on an old iPod Touch 2nd generation as is on a new Linux laptop. That’s not counting Windows™, Mac and Android.

At the same time I’d put a warning sign of “buyer beware” on your Hebrew resources. It’s a common belief that modern Israeli Hebrew is a resurrection of Biblical Hebrew. You know that’s not true. By the time of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Hebrew in use had more in common with the grammar of Greece than ancient Hebrew. Modern Israeli Hebrew is a updating and bringing to life Tiberian Hebrew, not Biblical Hebrew. Further, we don’t know how Biblical Hebrew was pronounced—a few pronunciations have survived, for example אב abba, שבת sabbata, לבי labaya, and names like יפת Yopate and ירושלם Yerewosoluma. One thing that comes through to me is that these words seem to back up my theory that every consonant was followed by a vowel. But they are far too few upon which to reconstruct a complete pronunciation for speaking.

What we find are professors who think that by adding a few archaizing terms to modern Israeli Hebrew, that they thereby teach Biblical Hebrew. So buyer beware.

Thank you for advertising your blog here.

Karl W. Randolph.

talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Wed May 02, 2018 8:56 am

Thanks Karl. Are there any of the Hebrew sources in particular that you have concerns about? You will note, of course, that I did put a "caveat lector" notice at the beginning of the resource page.
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Wed May 02, 2018 8:58 am

Yes, I've used some of the Crosswire resources in software such as MacSword and BibleDesktop. I will need to add their page to the list.
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Fri May 04, 2018 9:00 am

You're right, Karl, about the Tiberian pronunciation, although it seems there is general agreement that it reflects an ancient tradition. Of course the question is, "How ancient?". I will write up an advisory about that and add it to the Hebrew resources page. My own favorites on the pronunciation resources are the Biblia Mirecurensia files by Pierre Maignial (a French Hebrew professor) and the ones by John Simon (of GreekLatin Audio). Simon so far has only published Genesis 1-29 and Jonah, but they are excellent quality and very emotive.

Yes, I am aware Israeli Hebrew is not the same as Biblical, although there is a substantial core vocabulary that has survived relatively intact from BH. That is why you can understand a Hebrew translation of the New Testament even if you do not know modern Hebrew. (I am learning some, but only know a few phrases so far.) There are numerous differences in grammar and the vocabulary is a mix of Hebrew (with some changes and extensions in meaning to cover modern concepts and technologies, etc.) and words from English, other European languages, Arabic, etc.

One thing that helps us with Biblical Hebrew, besides a careful study of the Tanakh itself, is the light gained from inscriptions. Archaeologists are continuing to make interesting finds that add to our knowledge. I recommend all students of Hebrew become familiar with Biblical Archaeology Review journal and subscribe to it. A recent find of some bullae (seal impressions) revealed one that apparently belonged to the prophet Isaiah. Fascinating stuff.

Well, those are some of my thoughts on Biblical Hebrew. Feel free to follow up with other questions or comments.
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Fri May 04, 2018 9:33 am

As for the Niqudot or vowel points, while I recommend that students learn them, I don't spend time learning all the accent marks and cantillation, nor do I advise students to do so. The main value in the niqudot, besides an aid to pronunciation, is some help when deciding textual criticism issues. Although, as you've noted, they are demonstrably wrong in some cases, so need to be used with caution. While I normally read from a pointed text of the OT, I am starting to use the new Biblia Mirecurensia one, an ecclectic unpointed text. I recommend it to students also. Learning to read unpointed text also helps students access the Dead Sea Scrolls and, once the Paleo Hebrew script is learned, inscriptions. And should they want to expand their study to Israeli Hebrew, unpointed texts are the norm, so they're ahead of the game.
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

talmid56
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:02 am
Location: Carlisle, Arkansas, USA

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby talmid56 » Sat May 05, 2018 10:07 pm

Here's the statement on Hebrew pronunciation I've now put on the Resources page of my blog in the section on Hebrew Bible audio:

A Note on Hebrew Pronunciation

There are a variety of pronunciations of Biblical Hebrew used. Most scholars and teachers use an accent based on modern Israeli Hebrew, the Sephardic. As used for the Hebrew Bible, it is based on the Tiberian system developed by the Jewish Masoretes from the 6th to 10th centuries A.D. While most scholars agree that the Masoretes preserved and passed on an ancient tradition of pronunciation, it is unknown how ancient the tradition is, and it is unknown whether it goes back to Biblical times. It should be noted that the Masoretes began their work to vocalize (add vowel signs) to the Hebrew consonants of the Old Testament almost a millenium after the last Biblical book was written (Malachi in ca. 400 B.C.). For some good introductions to the topic, see the article by Jan Joosten, The Tiberian vocalization and the edition of the Hebrew Bible Text, available for download from Academia.edu, http://www.academia.edu/ and the article “Tiberian Hebrew” on Wikipedia.

As the Israeli/Tiberian pronunciation has become standard in Biblical studies, and since it does reflect an ancient tradition, I recommend using it. Two good sources of Hebrew Bible audio I really like and personally use are the new Biblia Mirecurensia project, http://biblia-mirecurensia.com/en/ (complete except for the Torah or Pentateuch) and the Hebrew section of John Simon’s site GreekNewTestamentAudio/LatinNewTestamentAudio, http://GreekNewTestamentAudio.com/, http://LatinNewTestamentAudio.com/, which has Genesis 1-29 and Jonah. These two are both more in conversational, emotive style than the accent used on the sites which have the complete set of the Hebrew Bible audio files, Academy of Ancient Languages and Mechon Mamre. (See below for the addresses of these two sites.) But for the sake of completeness, I recommend getting the files from each of these.
Dewayne Dulaney
דואיין דוליני

כִּ֤י שֶׁ֨מֶשׁ׀ וּמָגֵן֮ יְהוָ֪ה אֱלֹ֫הִ֥ים חֵ֣ן וְ֭כָבוֹד יִתֵּ֣ן יְהוָ֑ה לֹ֥א יִמְנַע־ט֝֗וֹב לַֽהֹלְכִ֥ים בְּתָמִֽים׃
--(E 84:11) 84:12 תהלים

kwrandolph
Posts: 868
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2013 12:51 am

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby kwrandolph » Sun May 06, 2018 2:18 pm

talmid56 wrote:Thanks Karl. Are there any of the Hebrew sources in particular that you have concerns about? You will note, of course, that I did put a "caveat lector" notice at the beginning of the resource page.


Dear Dewayne:

Yes, I saw the “caveat lector” at the beginning, then promptly forgot it. Par for the course for me.

As for warnings about websites linked in your “Resources” list, I know only one of the three listed for Hebrew learning. Therefore I can’t comment on the other two.

I’ve had some dealing with Randall Buth, on this forum no less, where I documented several errors concerning Biblical Hebrew language that he made. Unfortunately, that was when this forum was hosted by ibiblio, which, last time I checked, deleted many messages, even many whole threads, in which I had participated. I had trusted ibiblio to archive our discussions, a trust that was misplaced. I can no longer document those discussions. Randall Buth is very smart, and knows modern Israeli Hebrew very well, apparently knows other cognate languages well, but the Hebrew he teaches (as far as I can tell from his website) is unchanged from our discussions on b-hebrew, and that was basically modern Israeli Hebrew with some archaizings which he calls “Biblical Hebrew”. He made the claim that were Elijah to return tomorrow and sit in a Tel Aviv café, that Elijah would have no trouble understanding the conversations around him. If he still believes that, then I have no hope for him to improve.

As for Elijah, were he to return and sit in a Tel Aviv café tomorrow, I’d be surprised if he understood more than an occasional word, if even that, given the many changes that have happened in Hebrew language after he left.

Therefore, I’d put a big “caveat lector” on biblicallanguagecenter.com as far as Biblical Hebrew language is concerned. I don’t know koiné Greek well enough to comment on his Greek teaching.

Several others of your resources look interesting, thanks for listing them.

Karl W. Randolphl

kwrandolph
Posts: 868
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2013 12:51 am

Re: My New Biblical Studies Blog

Postby kwrandolph » Sun May 06, 2018 3:00 pm

talmid56 wrote:Here's the statement on Hebrew pronunciation I've now put on the Resources page of my blog in the section on Hebrew Bible audio:………


I agree with you that students should learn modern Hebrew pronunciation.

While I “blame” the Masoretes for inventing the vowel points, I am very careful not to claim that they invented the pronunciations that the vowel points preserve. From what I can see, that pronunciation could go back to the Mishnaic period.

When reading the New Testament in Greek, it appears that there was a pronunciation shift going on at that time. Backwards Galilee still had many of the older pronunciations, while more urbane Judea and the diaspora were further along in adopting new pronunciations. Examples include that the town of Nazareth was always spelled “Ναζαρετ” never “Ναζαρεθ”. Ματθιον shows partial assimilation of the new highbrow pronunciation of Μαθθιον. There are more examples that set Peter apart in the high priest’s garden. These examples and more have been preserved in the Byzantine or Majority Text tradition (not the same as “Textus Receptus”), but not in the Nestlé / Bible Society versions of the New Testament. (Which leads to the question, if the Majority Text preserves something as unimportant as clues to the Galilean accent, where else is it more accurate?)

Along with teaching the points, we should also teach that the points are human tradition, not canon. So students should be taught how to analyze verses to second guess the Masoretes.

Karl W. Randolph.


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